New open source license appreciated by software developers and companies

New open source license appreciated by software developers and companies

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Doctoral student Linus Nyman and Michael "Monty" Widenius, founder of MySQL and MariaDB, have joined forces to set out a new open source license for interested software developers and companies.

According to Nyman and Widenius, the open source method is eminent in the development of new software, as developments often are difficult to fund. With the newly developed business source license, originally Widenius idea, the aim is to keep the strengths of the open source approach, but to simplify the funding of the program development.

Nyman and Widenius introduced the new method in an academic article that was recently published in the journal Technology Innovation Management Review. After the article was published there have been reports from several companies who have changed or will change to the source business model, says Nyman happily.

"Readers have tweeted about and shared our article over 800 times in social media, which is quite unique for an academic article. We believe this business source is an important addition to the existing licenses. Many companies are interested in open source, but are worried about the funding challenges it may bring. The business source license retains the benefits of an open source, and at the same time the funding of the development gets easier".

The new license brings the advantages of an open source, which everyone has access to, and thus can modify and distribute freely. But a small segment of these users (approx. 1 % - determined by the developing company) must pay to use the license. After some years, the license changes to an open source license.

Nyman and Widenius continue their research cooperation and are soon to be published with a new article in the Technology Innovation Management Review, giving an introduction to the business of open source.

Read Nyman and Widenius' article Introducing "Business Source": The Future of Corporate Open Source Licensing?